A Funny Story About $20 Gold Coins

maple coin

Maple Leaf 1 oz Coin

We came back from Vancouver with two $20 gold pieces in our pocket. Actually, the idea came from Jim Rogers, who gave us one. We bought another to give to Henry for his 18th birthday.

“Hey…what’s this?” Henry wanted to know.

“It’s a gold coin… A Canadian maple leaf…”

“Oh…is it worth anything? It says it’s worth $20…kind of a measly birthday present, wouldn’t you say, Dad?”

“Well, it’s worth a lot more than that. It’s gold. An ounce of gold…”

“What’s that worth? Two hundred dollars?”

“A lot more than that…”

“But it says it’s worth $20. I guess at one time it was worth $20…”

“Yep.”

“Can you still use these for money? I mean, can you go into a shop in Canada and pay for things?”

“Well, maybe, but I don’t think it would be a good idea…”

“Or maybe you can say to your boss that you want to be paid in these coins? And then, when the IRS asks you how much you made, you can say $20?”

“I don’t know Henry, but I think that’s the sort of thing that people go to jail for.”

“Well, it’s their fault the coin is worth more than $20, isn’t it? You should be able to use it as $20. I mean, what’s going on, anyway? Something funny about this…”

“Oh Henry…this is a very long story…but you’re right. It’s very funny.”

 

Source: The Daily Reckoning Australia

Customer and Store Manager Perform a Dance

Music is a universal language for humans. It brings everyone together, no matter what race, culture or religion they belong to. There are no barriers because the music does the talking for us. It is something that everyone can relate to in regards to the different genres of music. Music can bring about peace, create friendships and do wonderful things for people. It’s true that you cannot have a conversation using music but you connect with people on such a high level that sometimes words cannot even take you to that place of connection. Similarly, a talented customer and the store manager of our Belair road location have recently performed such a wonderful dance to an Uzbek song. Attached here is an excerpt from their fun performance. Dance and stay warm through this cold weather! Click here to watch the footage: Uzbek-American Dance at Gold Rush

TEN Forgotten Stories About The Klondike Gold Rush. STORY 1: You Couldn’t Pack Light

packingThe Gold Rush began in 1896 with the discovery of gold in Canada’s largely uncharted Yukon territory. Word traveled fast, and within a year the northern reaches of Canada were swamped with people seeking their fortunes.

That caused a serious problem. People needed supplies to survive, and they needed a lot of supplies to survive the rocky, cold, hard trek in the North. Unfortunately, there was a distinct lack of grocery stores along the way. That meant that the small towns along the way were in danger of being overrun and being depleted of food.

The Canadian government enacted a provision that every American crossing the border for gold mining needed to bring their own supplies with them, and they needed to have enough to last them an entire year. That meant that a trip to the Yukon wasn’t just one-way—in some cases, people covered more than 1,610 kilometers (1,000 mi) back and forth between Alaska’s starting point of Dyea to their campsite at Bennett Lake. The two spots were only 53 kilometers (33 mi) apart, but a year’s worth of supplies was heavy and required way more than just one or two trips with a backpack.

The Northern Pacific Railroad put out a brochure with recommended provisions: 181 kilograms (400 lb) of flour, 4.5 kilograms (10 lb) of both coffee and tea, 34 kilograms (75 lb) of dried fruits, 56 kilograms (125 lb) of beans, and non-food supplies like tents, oil blankets, mosquito netting, axes, pitch, a stove, 60 meters (200 ft) of rope, and enough winter clothing to survive months of brutal temperatures.